NACCB 2018 Journalist Fellows

2018 NACCB Journalist Fellows

The fourth biennial North American Congress for Conservation Biology, held by the North America Section of the Society for Conservation Biology, will bring together leading researchers, conservationists, and decision-makers to discuss the science and practice of conserving biological diversity.
 
COMPASS is thrilled to bring a group of outstanding journalists to the conference as part of our journalist fellowship program, generously supported by Wilburforce Foundation and the Sitka Foundation. To learn more about them, click their pictures or scroll down; see also this blog post by Nancy Baron.
Andrea Appleton
Anne Casselman
Ashley Ahearn
Ben Goldfarb
Brandon Keim
Brian Owens
Bryce Hoye
Cara McKenna
Erik Vance
Hillary Rosner
John Upton
Katie Langin
Larry Pynn
Lesley Evans Ogden
Molly Segal
Niki Wilson
Sarah Cox
Susan Moran
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Andrea Appleton

Andrea Appleton is an independent journalist based in Baltimore, MD. Before turning to reporting, she dabbled in ecology; highlights included gathering moth eggs in rural Switzerland and a stint driving a mobile bug museum. Her work has appeared in Aeon, High Country News, National Geographic, Atlas Obscura, and elsewhere. 

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Anne Casselman

Anne Casselman is a National Magazine Award-nominated journalist with over ten years of experience and she regularly contributes to Scientific American, Canadian Geographic, The Walrus, BCBusiness magazine and National Geographic News. Anne was the expedition writer for Alexandra Cousteau’s Expedition Blue Planet 2010 and a fellow at the Marine Biological Laboratory’s Logan Science Journalism program and IJNR’s Kalamazoo River Institute. Anne has an undergraduate degree in Zoology from the University of Toronto and a Master’s in Science Communication from Imperial College, London. When not chasing up science and environment stories along British Columbia’s coast, she spends her time off-grid with her husband and daughter at their cabin on the Salish Sea.

 
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Ashley Ahearn

Ashley Ahearn is an award-winning public media journalist who has covered science and the environment for NPR and member stations for more than a decade. Most recently, she co-created, hosted and produced the podcast, Terrestrial, in partnership with the NPR Story Lab and KUOW in Seattle. Ashley’s stories have appeared on Marketplace, All Things Considered, Here and Now, The World and other NPR shows. She has a masters in science journalism from the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California and has completed reporting fellowships at the Knight Center at MIT, the Vermont Law School, the Metcalf Institute at the University of Rhode Island and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources. She recently started her own podcast consulting company, Ahearn Productions. In her spare time Ashley rides motorcycles and horses or plays outside with her husband and dog.

 

Ben Goldfarb

Ben Goldfarb is an award-winning conservation journalist whose writing has appeared in publications including Mother Jones, Science, The Guardian, Orion Magazine, High Country News, Outside, Audubon Magazine, Pacific Standard, and Yale Environment 360. He has spoken about environmental storytelling at venues including Stanford and Yale Universities, the American Fisheries Society, and the North American Congress for Conservation Biology. His first book, Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter, will be published in June 2018.

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Brandon Keim

Brandon Keim (@9brandon on Twitter and Instagram) is a freelance journalist specializing in animals, animals, and science. I'm also the co-founder of Conscientious Cat, an insect-based cat food company. My first book, The Eye of the Sandpiper, was published in June 2017 by the Cornell University Press. Also in 2017, National Geographic published Inside Animal Minds: What They Think, Feel and Know, my issue-length exploration of animal intelligence. My work has appeared in publications including The Atlantic, WIRED, National Geographic News, Aeon, Nautilus, The Guardian and elsewhere. I live in Bangor, Maine.

 

Brian Owens

Brian is a freelance science journalist and editor based in New Brunswick, Canada, where he writes for a variety of international publications including New Scientist, Nature, Science and Hakai Magazine. He previously worked in the UK as a news editor at Nature.

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Bryce Hoye

Bryce Hoye is a journalist and science writer with a background in wildlife biology. Before joining CBC Manitoba in the spring of 2014, he worked for the Canadian Wildlife Service monitoring birds in Manitoba, the Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia and Alberta for five summers.

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Cara McKenna

Cara McKenna is the editor of the Salish Sea Sentinel, covering Coast Salish First Nations in B.C. Cara is passionate about Indigenous media and her work has taken her across the country working for the Canadian Press, APTN National News, Metro News and the Nanaimo Daily News. She is of Alberta Métis descent and currently lives in Vancouver.

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Erik Vance

Erik Vance is a native Bay Area writer replanted in Mexico as a non-native species. Before becoming a writer he was, at turns, a biologist, a rock climbing guide, an environmental consultant, and an environmental educator. His work focuses on the human element of science – the people who do it, those who benefit from it, and those who do not. He has written for the New York Times, Nature, Scientific American, Harper’s, National Geographic, and a number of other local and national outlets. His first book, Suggestible You, is about how the mind and body continually twist and shape our realities. While researching the book he was poked, prodded, burned, electrocuted, hypnotized and even cursed by a witchdoctor, all in the name of science.

 

Hillary Rosner

Hillary Rosner is an independent journalist and editor based in Colorado, where she is a scholar-in-residence at the University of Colorado’s Center for Environmental Journalism. Her work has garnered multiple journalism awards, and her stories have appeared recently in National Geographic, the New York Times, Men’s Journal, Scientific American, Smithsonian, and bioGraphic, among other publications. 

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John Upton

John Upton is a features journalist at Climate Central, which is a nonprofit where scientists and journalists work together to research and report on the changing climate. Upton studied science and business in Australia and he previously worked as a journalist in California and in India. Now based in New York and New Jersey, he produces feature stories that are guided and informed by science, vividly revealing how climate change and solutions to it are affecting the lives of Americans. During more than a decade of international reporting, Upton has written for outlets that include the New York Times, Slate, Nautilus, VICE, Grist, Pacific Standard, Modern Farmer, and Audubon magazine.

 

Katie Langin

Katie Langin is a news intern at Science Magazine in Washington, D.C. With roots in academia, she holds a Ph.D. in ecology and has done research on the ecology, evolution, and conservation of birds. Her first taste of journalism was at National Geographic, where she joined the newsroom as a AAAS Mass Media Fellow. She’s also worked as a freelance journalist based in Fort Collins, Colorado, and loves writing stories about animals and the environment.

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Larry Pynn

Larry Pynn is the recipient of close to 30 journalism awards, including eight Jack Webster Awards and a citation of merit from the Michener Awards. He covers environment full-time for The Vancouver Sun and Province daily newspapers, part of the Postmedia News chain, as well as freelancing marine science articles for on-line Hakai Magazine. He is a member of the New York-based Explorers Club and has written two non-fiction books, The Forgotten Trail and Last Stands

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Lesley Evans Ogden

Lesley Evans Ogden is a freelance science journalist based in the suburbs of Vancouver, British Columbia. Fascinated by the wonders of nature since her toddler-aged habit of picking up caterpillars and snakes and pushing them around the backyard in a doll’s stroller, she typically writes about living things. Lesley’s curiosity is eclectic. Her main beats include ecology, conservation, quirky animal behaviour, environmental health and policy. Lesley leapt from scientist to science journalist after a PhD and postdoc in wildlife ecology. After wading through mud studying shorebirds and trudging up mountains before dawn studying songbirds, she completed Science Communications and Investigative Journalism programs at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity. Amongst other places, her work appears in Natural History, BioScience, New Scientist, Scientific American, Science News, BBC Earth, CBC, Science, Nature, Audubon, Mosaic, Undark and documentaries for television. Lesley is always on the lookout for under-reported stories and new venues to write or produce for. Still a bird nerd at heart, she sometimes writes with a budgerigar on her shoulder.

 
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Molly Segal

Molly Segal is an independent journalist based in Alberta’s Bow Valley, where she produces feature stories and documentaries for radio. Her work has broadcast on many of CBC’s national radio programs, including Ideas, Tapestry, The Doc Project and The Current, as well as NPR programs The Pulse and Here & Now. Her audio work has also been featured on various podcasts, including MIT’s Undark science podcast. Based in Banff, Molly covers various environment and conservation stories, including the ways in which people interact with wildlife. Molly has also worked for CBC Radio and TV, reporting and producing from Halifax, Calgary and Winnipeg. Some of her recent radio documentary work has taken her up in a helicopter in Jasper National Park, out in a bison paddock on southern Alberta’s Blood Reserve, and to a wolf sanctuary in Golden, British Columbia.

 
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Niki Wilson

Niki Wilson is science writer with a past life as a biologist. She grew up dodging bears in Jasper National Park, Canada, and has studied everything from mammoths to mountain pine beetle. She’s now traded the field for the computer screen, and writes about nature and the environment for publications like Bioscience, Canadian Wildlife Magazine, Natural History Magazine, Canadian Geographic and Motherboard. When not writing, she looks for other creative ways to communicate science, whether it be teaching, producing and hosting science events, or working on documentaries. She lives with her husband, a biologist and conservation officer with Parks Canada, and their 13-year-old son. They once dissected an elk liver as a family, which taught them about both liver fluke ecology, and gag reflexes. Say hello at nikiwilson.com.

 
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Sarah Cox

Sarah Cox is an environmental journalist based in Victoria, B.C. She is the author of the recently published book Breaching the Peace: the Site C Dam and a Valley’s Stand Against Big Hydro, which chronicles the on-going struggle to save B.C.’s Peace River Valley from a large hydro dam (UBC Press, May 2018). Sarah writes for The Narwhal as a legislative reporter focusing on energy and the environment. She previously worked as a staff reporter for major Canadian daily newspapers and as a freelance magazine writer for a variety of publications, covering topics ranging from trade and business to the environment and social justice issues. Sarah also spent close to a decade working for Sierra Club BC as strategy and communications director and for the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative as the senior conservation program manager. She has a master’s degree in political science from York University, and has won two Western Magazine Awards and a Vancouver Press Club Award.

 
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Susan Moran

Susan is a freelance journalist (print and media formerly known as print), and a host and producer of a weekly science show on KGNU community radio in Colorado, called "How On Earth." Her work focuses on biodiversity conservation, climate change (science, impacts, solutions), energy development, environmental health, and agriculture. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, The Economist, Nature, Popular Science, Discover, Ensia and several other publications. She also taught journalism as an adjunct instructor at the University of Colorado Boulder for seven years. She was a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT in 2009-1010, and a Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalist at the University of Colorado in 2001-2002. Formerly she worked on staff as a reporter and editor at several news organizations, including Reuters news agency and Business 2.0 magazine. She has a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University, and a master's degree in Asian studies from the University of California Berkeley. She lives in Boulder, Colo., with her husband. Unlike most Boulderites, she doesn’t rock climb (too scared of heights), but does like to hike, ski, and otherwise spend time wandering through forests and deserts when not glued to the computer monitor.

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